virtual mucilage
"Painted Tin Face Mask
The photo [above] is of a painted tin face mask  from 1918. It is from the Gillies Archives, Queen Mary’s Hospital, Sidcup UK.  This painted tin face mask from WWI was made by dental technician Archie Lane.  During World War I the Queen’s Hospital became the leading centre in Britain for  maxillofacial and plastic surgery. Over 5000 servicemen were admitted to the  wards of the Queen Mary’s Hospital from 1917 to 1921.”
These were made, of course, so men with facial wounds could walk down the street without everyone gawking at them.  Seeing them in B&W film clips, I was skeptical, but it’s actually freakishly realistic-looking, in a, “Hey, that’s guy’s holding a chunk of a fac—oh.” way.

"Painted Tin Face Mask

The photo [above] is of a painted tin face mask from 1918. It is from the Gillies Archives, Queen Mary’s Hospital, Sidcup UK. This painted tin face mask from WWI was made by dental technician Archie Lane. During World War I the Queen’s Hospital became the leading centre in Britain for maxillofacial and plastic surgery. Over 5000 servicemen were admitted to the wards of the Queen Mary’s Hospital from 1917 to 1921.”

These were made, of course, so men with facial wounds could walk down the street without everyone gawking at them. Seeing them in B&W film clips, I was skeptical, but it’s actually freakishly realistic-looking, in a, “Hey, that’s guy’s holding a chunk of a fac—oh.” way.

yama-bato:

Moorcroft Vase
This  vase by William Moorcroft was produced c.1902.

yama-bato:

Moorcroft Vase

This vase by William Moorcroft was produced c.1902.

yama-bato:

William Moorcroft
here


here
OMG—it’s Morrissey!

OMG—it’s Morrissey!

findingsfordot:

…and olives…

findingsfordot:

…and olives…

My head just did the opposite of explode.  It just sort of sighed and rolled off my neck, down to a beautiful beach, and onto a little raft to float peacefully and luxuriously forever, knowing that this is the most sensible, perfect thing it has ever seen.

My head just did the opposite of explode. It just sort of sighed and rolled off my neck, down to a beautiful beach, and onto a little raft to float peacefully and luxuriously forever, knowing that this is the most sensible, perfect thing it has ever seen.

yama-bato:

Vincent van Gogh
“Landscape with Bridge across the Oise”,  	473 x 629 mm, late May  	1890. Crayon, aquarelle and gouache on rose Ingres paper. Tate Gallery, London, England.

yama-bato:

Vincent van Gogh

“Landscape with Bridge across the Oise”, 473 x 629 mm, late May 1890.
Crayon, aquarelle and gouache on rose Ingres paper.
Tate Gallery, London, England.